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  Home

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Book Quizzes

 Chapter quizzes were a popular feature of my first books. Now that the books are in full color, the page count must be limited in order to keep the price reasonable. Instead of reducing book content, I opted to leave out the quizzes in the Gemstone Buying Guide, Gem & Jewelry Pocket Guide and Ruby, Sapphire & Emerald Buying Guide. You can still test your knowledge, however, by taking the quizzes on this website.

Below are some of the chapter quizzes that were in the Ruby & Sapphire Buying Guide and Emerald & Tanzanite Buying Guide. The answers can be found below each quiz and in the corresponding chapters of the Ruby, Sapphire & Emerald Buying Guide. Some answers will also be found in the less detailed Gemstone Buying Guide. Check back periodically for additional quizzes.

Carat Weight Chapter Quiz

Shape & Cutting Style Chapter Quiz

Judging Emerald Color Quiz

Judging Ruby Color Quiz

Judging Sapphire Color Quiz

Judging Clarity & Transparency Chapter Quiz

Judging Cut Chapter Quiz

Treatment Chapters Quiz

Carat Weight Chapter Quiz

True or False?

  1. A 2-carat fine-quality ruby is worth more than 10 rubies of the same color and quality which have a total weight of 4 carats.

  2.  One carat equals 1/5 of a gram.

  3.  A ten pointer is a stone with ten facet junctions..

  4.  Appraisers can determine the exact carat weight of a gemstone by measuring it and using mathematical formulas to calculate the weight.

  5.  When comparing gem prices, you should compare their per-carat cost.

  6. A one-carat round emerald is larger than a one-carat round sapphire.

  7.  When estimating the weight of a gemstone, you should take into account its shape and proportioning.

Answer the following questions:

  1. If a tanzanite weighs 4 carats and costs $1600, what is its per carat price?

  2. Whatís the total cost of a 2-carat emerald which sells for $2500 per carat?

  3. Whatís the cost of a 0.25-carat ruby that sells for $400 per carat?

  4. What would be the estimated weight of a well-proportioned pear-shape sapphire that is 8mm long, 5mm wide and 3.5mm deep. (See page 24 of the Ruby, Sapphire & Emerald Buying Guide.)

Answers:

  1. True. Fine quality rubies over 1 carat have a much greater per-carat value than small rubies of the same quality.

  2. True

  3. False.  A ten pointer is a stone that weights 10 points or 1/10 of a carat.

  4. False.  The only way to determine the exact weight of a stone is to weigh it.

  5. True

  6. True. Emeralds have a lower density (specific gravity) than sapphires. Consequently the emerald would look larger.

  7. True

  8. $400        $1600 ų 4

  9. $5000      $2500 x 2

  10. $100        $400 x 0.25

  11.  1.12 carats  (8 x 5 x 3.5 x 4.00 x .0020)                                        

Shape & Cutting Style Chapter Quiz

True or False?

  1. A 1-carat round emerald would typically cost less than a 1-carat emerald-cut emerald, all other factors being equal.

  2. All step cuts are emerald cuts.

  3. The mixed cut is the most common faceting style for rubies and sapphires.

  4. The cabochon cut is usually reserved for fine-quality, high-value stones.

  5. Brilliant-style cuts have triangular and lozenge-shaped facets.

  6. A mixed cut normally displays more color than an emerald cut.

  7. When judging prices, consumers should try to compare stones of the same shape and cutting style.

  Answer the following questions:

  8.   What is the bottom cone-shaped portion of a stone called?

  9.   What is the name of the narrow rim around the circumference of a stone?

 10.   What is the large top facet of a stone called?

 

Answers:

  1. False. In higher qualities, the 1-carat round emerald would tend to cost more because of its high demand and lower yield from the rough. If it were of commercial or low quality, it probably would cost about the same as the emerald cut.

  2. False. A step cut with square corners is not an emerald cut, but all emerald cuts are step cuts.

  3. True

  4. False. Most high-quality stones of high value are faceted.

  5. True

  6. False. The mixed cut usually displays more brilliance than the emerald cut but not more color.

  7. True

  8. The pavilion

  9. The girdle

  10. The table                                                                 Top of page

Judging Emerald Color Quiz  (Chapter 6, Ruby, Sapphire & Emerald B.G.)

True or False?

  1. As emeralds get lighter in color, their value decreases.

  2. You should only look at gems under a neutral fluorescent light.

  3. The more grayish or brownish an emerald is, the less it is worth.

  4. Grading emerald color is easier than grading diamond color.

  5. The distinction between green beryl and emerald has been clearly defined by the trade.

  6. The jewelry trade does not have a standardized system for grading colored gemstones.

  7. Emerald and aquamarine have the same chemical composition.

  8. Emerald color should be judged against a yellow background.

  9. Emeralds that are strongly bluish or yellowish are normally less valued than those which range from slightly bluish to slightly yellowish.

  10. An emerald must originate from Colombia to be of good quality.

Answers:

  1. True

  2. False. When buying gems, you should look at them under different kinds of light, particularly the types of lighting under which they will be worn. Use a neutral fluorescent light, however, for gem grading.

  3. True

  4. False. Emerald color grading is much more complex.

  5. False. There are no clear definitions for emerald or green beryl which have been adopted by the jewelry trade.

  6. True

  7. True

  8. False. It should be graded against a non-reflective white background.

  9. True

  10. False. Although most of the finest large emeralds have come from Colombia, high-quality emeralds are also produced in other countries.           

Judging Ruby Color Quiz (Chapter 5 of the Ruby, Sapphire & Emerald Buying

     Guide and Chapters 1 & 4 and page 114 to 117 of the Gemstone Buying Guide.

    Select the correct answer

   1.  Under what type of light will a ruby look reddest?

        a. A fluorescent light

        b. A standard 100-watt light bulb

        c. Daylight under a cloudy sky

        d. A daylight equivalent light

   2.  Which of the following terms refers to how light or how dark a gemstone is?

        a. Hue

        b. Tint

        c. Tone

        d. Brightness

   3.  Which of the following can affect your perception of color?

        a. Lighting

        b. Medications

        c. The color of your clothes

        d. All of the above

   4.  Itís easier to grade the color of diamonds than of rubies because

        a. Diamonds are colorless

        b. Diamond color grades only indicate how light or dark the color is

        c. Diamonds donít have as many rainbow-like interference colors as rubies.

        d. Diamonds are controlled by a cartel which has standardized how they are graded.

   5.  Louise bought a ruby ring in Bangkok at Christmas. When she got back to her home

        in Canada, the ruby didnít look as red and bright as it did in Bangkok. Explain why.

        a. The jeweler probably switched the stone.

        b. Canadians have a distorted sense of color.

        c. The sunlight in Canada doesnít bring out the red of a ruby as well as the tropical

            sunlight of Bangkok.

        d. Louise probably drank too much alcohol while she was in Bangkok.

    True or False?

    6.  Grayish red is a less valuable color for a ruby than a pure slightly purplish red.

    7.  Itís best to examine rubies against a red background.

    8.  The darker the ruby, the more valuable it is.

    9.  Itís easier for people to compare color than to remember it.

   10.  In some countries, pink and purple sapphires are called rubies.

   11.  Mong Hsu, Burma is the premier source of fine-quality, natural-color ruby.

   12.  The best way to judge the color of a ruby is to look at it for a long time so your eyes

         and mind can absorb as much of the color as possible.

   13.  Currently the major source of rubies is Thailand

   Answers:

  1. B

  2. C

  3. D

  4. B

  5. C

  6. True

  7. False

  8. False. Not always. Very dark rubies with a lot of black areas are not highly prized.

  9. True

  10. True

  11. False. Mogok, Burma (Myanmar) is the premier source of fine-quality, natural-color ruby. Virtually all rubies from Mong Hsu undergo high-temperature heat treatment.

  12. False. Focusing on one color for a long period can distort your perception of it. Itís best to glance at other colors every now and then.

  13. False.  Myanmar (Burma) is currently the major producer.     Top of page

Judging Sapphire Color Quiz:  (Chapter 7, Ruby, Sapphire & Emerald Buying

       Guide and Chapters 1 & 4 and pages 114 to 117 of the Gemstone Buying Guide)

True or False?

  1.   Purple is a more highly valued sapphire color than pink.

  2.   Sapphires with bands or patterns of different color normally cost more than those

       with one even color.

  3.   The less grayish a sapphire is, the greater its value.

  4.   Orange sapphires usually sell for more than yellow sapphires

  5.   Greenish blue is normally a less valuable color for a sapphire than violetish blue.

  6.   In most cases, the lower the quality of a stone, the less impact color has on its price.

  7.   Many green sapphires resemble emeralds.

Answer the following questions

  8    What two colors do true padparadschas have?

  9.   What are non-blue sapphires called?

 10.   What is another name for colorless sapphire?

 11.   Where are most of the fine-quality sapphires mined today?

Answers:

  1. False

  2. False

  3. True

  4. True

  5. True

  6. True

  7. False

  8. Pink and orange

  9. Fancy-color sapphires

  10. White sapphire

  11. Madagascar. Sri Lanka (Ceylon) and Myanmar (Burma) are also important sources of fine-quality sapphires.                                             

Judging Clarity & Transparency Chapter Quiz  (Chapter 8, Ruby,

        Sapphire & Emerald Buying Guide, Chapter 5, Gemstone Buying Guide)

 Select the correct answer

 1.   Which of the following is the least serious imperfection in a sapphire?

       a. Broad color bands

       b. A long Crack

       c. A large crystal

       d. A big chip

 2.   Youíre in a jewelry store and the owner asks to see your ruby ring. He places it under a microscope and tells you the ruby has a small crack in the center, so it is a lousy stone.

       When you look through the microscope, you are able to see a tiny line in the

       center of the ruby and a small round form near the girdle. This means:

       a. Your ruby is defective

       b. Your ruby will soon crack into pieces

       c. The owner is unprofessional, and he is giving you misleading information

       d. The owner is a true ruby expert and deserves your patronage

 3.   Which of the following are commonly found in rubies and sapphires?

       a. Naturals

       b. Carbon inclusions

       c. Fingerprint inclusions

       d. Laser drill holes

 

True or False?

  1. Fractures and liquid inclusions are commonly found in emeralds.

  2. Rubies tend to have more flaws than sapphires.

  3. Rubies, sapphires and emeralds don't need to be examined under magnification because what's important is their color and general appearance.

  4. Surface cracks are best identified with darkfield or transmitted light.

  5. Flaws are less obvious in dark stones than in lighter ones.

  6. Emeralds usually have more inclusions than other gems.

  7. When evaluating clarity, you should only look at the face-up view of the stone.

  8. Most emeralds sold in jewelry are transparent.

  9. Darkfield illumination is helpful for detecting internal fractures and fillings.

  10. Clarity is the least important factor in determining the price of a ruby, sapphire or emerald.

  11. Flaws can sometimes increase the value of a gemstone.

  12. The GIA clarity grade" SI1" has four different definitions.

  13. If a jeweler tells you the clarity grade of a stone and the grade is high, you donít need to look at it under magnification.

Answers:

  1. A

  2. C

  3. C

  4. True

  5. True

  6. False. Cracks which could threaten the durability of the stone may be hard to see with the naked eye. Besides being an aid to clarity grading, magnification is also important for detecting imitations, synthetics and treatments.

  7. False. They're best identified with light reflected off the surface of the stone

  8. True

  9. True

  10. False. You should examine the stones from several different angles.

  11. False. Most emeralds found in jewelry range from semi-transparent through semi-translucent.

  12. True

  13. False. Shape is probably the least important factor. If the clarity is terrible, emeralds and tanzanites will have a low value no matter how good their color is, how well they are cut, or how big they are.

  14. True. Because of their beauty or by serving as evidence that a stone is untreated or from a desirable area such as Kashmir or Mogok, Burma

  15. True. One definition for diamonds and three for colored stones.

  16. False. Not all jewelers grade stones alike. Some may even change the definitions, and the stone might in actuality have a low clarity. To get a clear and accurate picture of a gemstone, itís best to look at it both with and without magnification.      

                                                                                      Top of page

Judging Cut Chapter Quiz  (Chapter 9, Ruby, Sapphire & Emerald Buying

       Guide, Chapter 6 Gemstone Buying Guide)

True or False?

  1. The way a gemstone is cut can affect its color, clarity and brilliance.

  2. Stones with few facets and very low crowns generally have less sparkle than those with more facets and higher crowns.

  3. The jewelry trade has established formal guidelines on how cut quality affects price.

  4. Colored gems with shallow pavilions tend to have "windows."

  5. Emeralds and rubies are usually better proportioned than tanzanite and because they cost more.

  6. Stones with very thick girdles tend to look large for their weight.

  7. Sometimes poorly cut stones in a parcel are priced the same as those which are well cut.

  8. Stones with very thin or uneven girdles may be hard to set.

  9. Most emeralds show no windowing.

  10. The total cost of a well-cut stone may be about the same as a bulky stone with a lower per-carat price and the same face-up size..

  11. Windowing can reduce the color and brilliance of a gem.

  12. To insure maximum reflection of light, sapphires must be cut deeper than diamonds.

Answers:

  1. True

  2. True

  3. False

  4. True

  5. False. Since good emerald and ruby rough is usually more expensive than good tanzanite rough, cutters are more likely to try and save weight at the expense of beauty and symmetry.

  6. False. They tend to look small for their weight.

  7. True

  8. True

  9. False. Most emeralds show some windowing, but the degree of windowing varies.

  10. True. When you buy bulky stones with bulging pavilions and thick girdles, you end up paying for unnecessary weight which reduces beauty and face-up size.

  11. True

  12. True                                                               

Treatment Chapters Quiz  ( Chapters 10 & 11 of the Ruby, Sapphire &

        Emerald Buying Guide, Chapter 8 of the Gemstone Buying Guide)

True or False?

  1. The heat treatment of rubies and sapphires can improve their color and clarity or it can create a star effect.

  2. All tanzanite is heat treated.

  3. Heat-treated tanzanite will fade if exposed to sunlight.

  4. Most emeralds have fracture fillings.

  5. Blue topaz and pink tourmaline are commonly irradiated to create or improve their color.

  6. The price of tanzanite is partially based on its color prior to heat treatment.

  7. With the aid of a loupe, it's easy for lay people to detect emerald fractures and fillings.

  8. Emeralds are occasionally treated with colored fillers to make them look greener.

  9. Gem treatments allow consumers to have a better selection of stones to choose from.

  10. If an appraiser has a gemologist diploma, then he/she is qualified to appraise emeralds.

  11. "Mystic topaz" has a special coating that makes the stone appear to have a play of color.

  12. Rubies are sometimes oiled to help mask fractures.

  13. Appraisals should include relevant treatment information as well as details about the identity, color and quality of a stone.

Answers:

  1. True

  2. False. Not all of it is treated but the vast majority of it is.

  3. False. The color of tanzanite is stable.

  4. True

  5. True

  6. False. It's just the color after heat treatment that counts.

  7. False. Even though some fractures and fillings are easy to spot with a loupe, there are others which are hard for trained professionals to detect even with the aid of a microscope. When buying expensive emeralds, professional assistance is essential.

  8. True

  9. True

  10. False. Experience, market knowledge, and additional education is required. To obtain a gemologist diploma, you don't need to know how to detect emerald treatments or grade and price emeralds.

  11. True

  12. True

  13. True                                                                          Top of page

Newman Gem & Jewelry Series and Osteoporosis Book Links

Diamond Ring Buying Guide, Details & Reviews

Diamond Handbook, Details & Reviews

Gem & Jewelry Pocket Guide, Details & Reviews

Gemstone Buying Guide, Details & Reviews

Gold, Platinum, Palladium, Silver & Other Jewelry Metals, Details & Reviews

Pearl Buying Guide, Details & Reviews

Ruby, Sapphire & Emerald Buying Guide, Details & Reviews

Osteoporosis Prevention, Details & Reviews

Jewelry Handbook, Detail & Reviews

Exotic Gems, Volume 1, Details & Reviews

Exotic Gems, Volume 2, Details & Reviews

Rare Gemstones, Details

 

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