Home

  About Me

  Appraisers

  My Books

  Q & Answers

  Contact Info

  Buy My Books

  Other Books

  Pearl Quizzes

  Other Quizzes

 avoidboneloss.com

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

 

a

  Home

  About Me

  Appraisers

  My Books

  Q & Answers

  Buy My Books

  Contact Info

  Other Books

  Pearl Quizzes

  Other Quizzes

 avoidboneloss.com

 

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

aa

 

  Home

  About Me

  Appraisers

  Buy My Books

  My Books

  Q & Answers

  Contact Info

  Other Books 

  Pearl Quizzes

  Other Quizzes

a

a

a

 

Gemstone Buying Guide Quizzes

Below are quizzes on the first ten chapters of the Gemstone Buying Guide. The answers are at the bottom, after the ten sets of chapter questions.

Chapter 1 / Colored Gem Price Factors in a Nutshell

Chapter 2 / Shape & Cutting Style

Chapter 3 / Carat Weight

Chapter 4 / Judging Color

Chapter 5 / Judging Clarity & Transparency

Chapter 6 / Judging Cut Quality

Chapter 7 / Star & Cat'e-eye Stones

Chapter 8 / Treatments

Chapter 9 / Synthetic Stones

Chapter 10 / Deceptive Practices

Chapter 1 / Colored Gem Price Factors in a Nutshell

1. Name at least eight factors that can affect the price of colored gemstones.

2. What are the gemological terms for internal flaws and external flaws?

3. Name at least four gemstones that display chatoyancy (a cats-eye effect).

4. What stone has a floating shifting light effect called adularescence?

5. What is the glittery, sparkling effect displayed by sunstone called?

6. Name at least two stones besides alexandrite that can display a color change effect.

7. What region of Canada has a gemstone and a phenomenal effect named after it?

8. What stone is famous for its play of color?

9. What is the technical name for pearl iridescence?

True or false?

10. If a stone is brownish or grayish, it is undesirable.

11. Transparency can have a major impact on the price of a gemstone.

12. There is no universally accepted grading system for colored gemstones.

Go to Chapter 1 answers

 

Chapter 2 / Shape & Cutting Style

1. How do shape and cutting style differ?

2. Describe a cushion shape.

3. What is the usual resulting shape of a tumbled gemstone?

4. What are the flat polished surfaces on a gemstone called?

5. What is the large top flat facet on a gemstone called?

6. What is the narrow rim encircling a gemstone called (Hint itís sold in the same department as womenís bras)?

7. What is the bottom cone-shaped portion of a gemstone called?

8. What is the top part of a gemstone above the girdle called?

9. What is the name of the tiny facet that sometimes appears on the bottom of a gemstone?

10. What are unfaceted dome-shaped stones such as jade and catís-eye called?

11. What is the biggest difference between a step-cut gemstone and one that is brilliant cut?

12. Briolettes normally have what shape?

13. Name at least three types of art forms that can be considered carvings.

True or false?

14. A radiant cut and emerald cut have the same shape.

15. All step cuts are emerald cuts.

16. All full-cut round brilliant-cut gems have 58 facets.

17. Beads may have either brilliant or step-type facets.

18. An intaglio is an engraved stone with a design or picture cut in relief.

19. Druse is a crust of tiny crystals on the surface of a rock or mineral.

20. Itís best to avoid soaps and detergents when cleaning drusy stones.

Go to Chapter 2 answers

 

Chapter 3 / Carat Weight

True or false?

1. "Carat" is a unit of weight equaling one-fifth of an ounce.

2. The weight of small gemstones may also be expressed in points.

3. One point is one one-hundredth of a carat.

4. A one-carat round emerald is larger than a one-carat round ruby.

5. What is the per-carat cost of a ten-carat stone selling for $1000?

6. The price and weight categories for colored gems are the same from one dealer to another.

7. When judging prices, you should compare stones of similar size, shape, color and quality.

Go to Chapter 3 answers                                                                            Top of page

 

Chapter 4 / Judging Color

1. What is a gemological term for uneven distribution of color?

2. What is a commonly used term to describe the degree of lightness or darkness of a gemstone?

3. What type of lighting intensifies blue colors?

4. What type of lighting intensifies red colors?

5. When buying gems, under what type of light should you look at gems.

True or false?

6. Green and yellowish green are both hues.

7. Light colored gems tend to sell for less than stones with medium to medium-dark tones.

8. Faceted gemstones normally display one tone in the face-up view.

9. Highly saturated colors display a lot of brown or gray.

10. If you donít plan to resell a gemstone, thereís no need to base your choice on trade preferences.

Go to Chapter 4 answers

 

Chapter 5 / Judging Clarity & Transparency

1. What does eye-clean mean?

2. Name at least two colored gemstones that often have eye-visible inclusions.

3. What adjective describes non-transparent materials that allow no light to pass through them?

4. What adjective is most often used to describe the transparency of jade?

5. Give at least three examples of a gemstone inclusion.

6. Give at least one example of a gemstone blemish.

7. What power of magnification is normally used for grading gemstones?

True or false?

8. Clarity is the least important factor when pricing rubies and emeralds.

9. Itís relatively easy to find high-clarity topaz and tanzanite.

10. Even though flaws often have a negative impact on value, their presence can be positive.

11. Silk inclusions are more serious than cleavages.

12. Lighting can affect your perception of clarity.

Go to Chapter 5 answers                                                                            Top of page 

Chapter 6 / Judging Cut Quality

1. What is a trade term for the proportions and finish of a gemstone?

2. What is a window in a gemstone?

True or false?

3. The term "cut" is confusing because it has different meanings.

4. Windowing can reduce the color and brilliance of a gemstone.

5. The finish normally has a significant impact on the price of colored gems.

6. Well-cut colored gemstones should be proportioned like diamonds.

7. The main reason to be concerned about the cut quality of a gemstone is because of its impact on price.

8. Dealers use the term "life" to refer to the overall brilliance and sparkle of a gemstone.

Go to Chapter 6 answers                                                                             Top of page

 

Chapter 7 / Star & Catís-Eye Stones

1. What optical effect does a catís-eye gemstone display?

2. What optical effect does a gem with a star formation display?

3. To which gem species does a stone identified as simply "cats-eye" belong?

4. What is the most important consideration when buying a chatoyant gem?

True or false?

5. Star gems can have from four to twelve rays.

6. Most natural star sapphires are more pale than natural faceted sapphire.

7. The degree of transparency plays a major role in determining the value of star gems.

8. Itís relatively easy to find natural sapphires with sharp stars.

Go to Chapter 7 answers                                                        

 

Chapter 8 / Gem Treatments

1. Name at least three gemstones that are commonly heat-treated.

2. Name at least one gemstone that is routinely irradiated.

3. Which well-known gemstone routinely undergoes a fracture-filling process?

4. Name at least one gemstone that is commonly dyed.

5. Name at least two gemstones that are commonly waxed or coated with plastic substances.

True or false?

6. A premium may be charged for certain high-quality untreated gemstones.

7. If a gemologist canít identify the treatments a gemstone has undergone, then he or she is incompetent.

8. Some treatments are more accepted than others.

9. If a treatment is permanent and does not affect the durability of a gemstone, it does not have to be disclosed.

10. Reputable sellers give their customers practical advice and basic facts about gem treatments.

Go to Chapter 8 answers                                                                       Top of page 

 

Chapter 9 / Synthetic Stones

True or false?

1. Imitation emerald is a synthetic emerald.

2. Lab-grown ruby has been available since the early 1900's.

3. In the gem trade, the terms "synthetic gem" and "lab-grown gem" and "created gem" are synonyms.

4. A lab-grown ruby is exactly the same as a natural ruby.

5. "Cultured" is another synonym for "lab-grown."

6. One of the biggest advantages of synthetic stones is that they can look attractive and expensive, but are normally a lot more affordable than high-quality natural stones.

7. One of the main reasons lab-grown stones are so affordable is that they can be produced in whatever quantities are needed, and therefore are not as rare as natural gemstones.

Go to Chapter 9 answers

 

Chapter 10 / Deceptive Practices

1. Why are gemstones sometimes coated with colored substances?

2. Why should you beware of closed-back settings?

3. Why are some stones quench crackled?

4. What are stones composed of two parts called?

5. Name a composite stone that is typically disclosed and sold in a legitimate manner?

6. What is the key to identifying a composite stone?

7. What is Herkimer diamond?

8. What is black onyx?

9. What is spinel ruby?

10. What misnomer is sometimes used for citrine quartz?

Go to Chapter 10 answers                                                                         Top of page 

 

Chapter 1 Answers:

1. Color, clarity, transparency, shape, cutting style, cut quality, carat weight or stone size, treatment status, place of origin and the distinctness of optical phenomena can all affect the price of colored gemstones.

2. Inclusions (internal flaws), and blemishes (external flaws)

3. Chrysoberyl (catís-eye), emerald, aquamarine, apatite, quartz, tourmaline, hawkís-eye, tigerís eye, opal, zircon

4. Moonstone

5. Aventurescence

6. Garnet, sapphire, spinel, tourmaline; another color-change stone not mentioned in the Gemstone Buying Guide is zultanite (color-change diaspore). However, you can read about it in Exotic Gems, Volume 1.

7. Labrador produces labradorite, which displays labradorescence.

8. Opal

9. Orient

10. False: If youíd like a stone that coordinates well with gray or brown clothing, gray and brown stones can be quite desirable. If youíre a stone collector looking to complete a series of colors for a gemstone species, brown and gray stones can also be desirable. If youíre looking for a strong red ruby, than a grayish or brownish ruby is not desirable. Desirability depends on the goal of the buyer.

11. True. The difference in price between a transparent ruby or sapphire, for example, and a cloudy or nearly opaque stone can be hundreds and even thousands of dollars. The degree of transparency (also called translucency) in jade can also result in a significant price difference.

12. True                                                                                                   Top of page 

 

Chapter 2 Answers:

1. Shape is a gemstoneís face up outline; cutting style refers to the way a stone is cut or faceted.

2. A cushion shape is a squarish or rectangular shape with curved sides and rounded corners.

3. Baroque, which means irregular in outline.

4. Facets

5. Table

6. Girdle

7. Pavilion

8. Crown

9. Culet

10. Cabochons

11. The shape of the facets. Most brilliant-style facets are three-sided or kite- or lozenge-shaped. Most of the facets on step-cut gems are four sided and elongated, resembling steps.

12. A tear-drop shape

13. Engravings, cameos, intaglios, sculptures, fantasy cuts.

14. True. Both emerald cuts and radiants are rectangular or squarish in shape with beveled (clipped) off corners, making them eight-sided.

15. False. For example, baguettes are step cuts but not emerald cuts. All emerald cuts, however, are step cuts.

16. False. Many round brilliants do not have a culet, which means they have only 57 facets. In addition cutters often add or combine facets in order to polish away flaws or save weight.

17. True. And sometimes beads even have no facets.

18. False. A Cameo is an engraved stone with a design or picture cut in relief. An intaglio is a shallow design carved below the surface of a gemstone.

19. True

20. True. Soaps and detergents can leave a film, which clings to the textured druse.

 

Chapter 3 Answers:

1. False, A carat equals one-fifth of a gram.

2. True

3. True

4. True. The emerald will be larger because it has a lower specific gravity than ruby.

5. $100

6. False. The price and weight categories can vary significantly from one dealer to another.

7. True                                                                                                            Top of page 

 

Chapter 4 Answers:

1. Color zoning

2. Tone

3. Fluorescent lighting and light under an overcast sky or in the shade.

4. Incandescent light bulbs, candlelight, pen lights, sunsets.

5. When buying gems you should examine them in the types of lighting under which they will be worn. The best gemstones look good under all types of lighting. Diamonds should be graded, however, under a neutral, white diffused lighting, that does not add color.

6. True

7. True

8. False. Faceted gems normally display a variety of light and dark tones

9. False. The greater the color saturation, the less brown or gray is present.

10. True. If youíre the person that will wear the stone, choose the color you like best, that looks good on you and that fits your budget.

 

Chapter 5 Answers:

1. Free of eye-visible flaws

2. Emerald, ruby, alexandrite

3. Opaque

4. Translucent

5. Crystals, pinpoints, grains, negative crystals, needles or growth tubes, clouds, silk, cracks or fractures, fissures, breaks or feathers, halos, fingerprints, fluid inclusions, growth or color zoning, cavities

6. Scratches, pits and abrasions are blemishes mentioned in the book.

7. Ten-power

8. False. Shape is probably the least important price factor. If the clarity is terrible, rubies and emeralds will have a low value no matter how good their color is, how well they are cut, or how big they are.

9. True

10. True. They can help identify the gemstone and they can help prove that it is natural, untreated or from a desirable locality. Occasionally, they may even make it more attractive as in certain agates.

11. False. Cleavages are more serious because they can affect durability.

12. True                                                                                                       Top of page 

 

Chapter 6 Answers:

1. Make

2. A washed out area in the center of the stone that allows you to see through the stone

3. True. "Cut" can refer to a gem's shape, cutting style or the quality of the cut including the finish and proportions.

4. True

5. False

6. False. Because of their different optical properties, they must be cut differently to achieve maximum beauty. For example, colored gems usually have to be cut deeper than diamonds to maximize brilliance.

7. False. The main reason to be concerned about the cut quality is because of its impact on the appearance of the gem. A well-cut gem is more attractive, but this is not always reflected in the price of the stone.

8. True   

 

Chapter 7 Answers:

1. Chatoyancy

2. Asterism

3. Chrysoberyl

4. The distinctness of the eye

5. True

6. True

7. True

8. False. If you want a sapphire with a long, sharp, symmetrical star, youíll probably have buy a lab-grown stone.                                                                                     Top of page 

 

Chapter 8 Answers:

1. Ruby, sapphire, aquamarine, tanzanite, carnelian, pink topaz, green tourmaline, citrine, blue and red zircon among others 

2. Blue topaz, pink tourmaline

3. Emerald

4. Chalcedony (onyx), lapis

5. Turquoise, jade, lapis

6. True

7. False. Sometimes itís impossible even for major gem labs to identify certain treatments.

8. True. For example, heat treatment is more accepted than dyeing or fracture filling.

9. False. All treatments should be disclosed to buyers when known.

10. True

 

Chapter 9 Answers:

1. False. Unlike synthetic emerald, imitation emerald does not have the same chemical composition as a natural emerald. Imitation emerald is a different substance that just resembles an emerald.

2. True

3. True

4. False. Even though lab-grown ruby is mostly the same as natural ruby, it has some differences, which is why gemologists are able to distinguish lab-grown ruby from natural ruby.

5. False. Culturing pearls is a more natural process than growing gems in a laboratory. Therefore itís considered deceptive to describe lab-grown gemstones as cultured.

6. True

7. True                                                                                            Top of page  

 

Chapter 10 Answers:

1. To change or improve their color.

2. Because something like foilbacking, paint or a coating may be hidden. Sometimes, though, closed back settings are used with legitimate gemstones. For example, a natural-color diamond may have a closed back setting to help bring out its color. However, the diamond will be accompanied by a report from a respected lab such as the GIA indicating itís actual color.

3. Quench crackling is occasionally done to synthetic stones to make them look more like natural stones. Quench crackling is also done to create cracks in inexpensive natural gems, which can then be filled with colored dyes or oils and made to look like expensive gems such as rubies and emeralds.

4. Doublets

5. Opal doublet, or opal triplet, which has a protective top of glass or quartz.

6. The key to identifying a composite stone is to find where its parts have been joined together.

7. Rock crystal quartz

8. Dyed chalcedony

9. Spinel

10. Topaz.   

                                                                                                      Top of page

Newman Gem & Jewelry Series and Osteoporosis Book Links

Diamond Ring Buying Guide, Details & Reviews

Diamond Handbook, Details & Reviews

Gem & Jewelry Pocket Guide, Details & Reviews

Gemstone Buying Guide, Details & Reviews

Gold, Platinum, Palladium, Silver & other Jewelry Metals, Details & Reviews

Pearl Buying Guide, Details & Reviews

Ruby, Sapphire & Emerald Buying Guide, Details & Reviews

Osteoporosis Prevention, Details & Reviews

Jewelry Handbook, Details & Reviews

Exotic Gems, Volume 1, Details & Reviews

Exotic Gems, Volume 2, Details & Reviews 

Rare Gemstones, Details

 

 

   Copyright © 2003 and 2013 by Renťe Newman